This content is provided by Capital One Bank

Provided by Capital One Bank

This content was written by the advertiser and edited by BG BrandLab to uphold The Boston Globe's content standards. The news and editorial departments of The Boston Globe had no role in its writing, production, or display.

Keep your money resolutions, one tiny step at a time

Most of us start the New Year on a positive note with the best of intentions, but come March, how many of us have either not acted on our resolutions at all or gave them an initial try but have since given up? Don’t be discouraged if you find it difficult to keep your resolutions. You’re not alone, and it’s not a question of willpower. It turns out that nearly half (42.5%) of people who make resolutions don’t succeed because they are setting goals that are too big and too broad.[1]

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For the 41% of Americans who usually make New Year’s resolutions,[2] improving their relationship with money is a common theme. In fact, along with health and fitness-related goals, “Making Better Financial Decisions,” Saving Money,” or “Spending Less/Saving More” frequently make the top five most popular resolutions.[3] It’s not surprising, considering that 62% of Americans say money is a common stressor, even more so than work and the current political climate.[4]

With so many people feeling financial anxiety, it makes sense to want to start the New Year with a new focus on improving your relationship with money. However, if you feel like you’re already falling behind on your goals, a simple shift in your mindset can get you back on the right track.

Capital One is on a quest to help people improve their financial confidence though programs like Money Coaching, a series of three complimentary sessions aimed at helping people identify their money values, getting their money under control, and getting on the right path toward meeting their goals. To help people who may be having trouble sticking to their resolutions, or who aren’t sure where to begin, Capital One’s Money Coaches recently partnered with James Clear, an author, speaker, and expert on micro-habits, to develop a series of digestible and actionable tips to help people get started on the path to financial confidence.

“Many people struggle to stay focused on their long-term goals because they seem too big and out of reach,” says James Clear. “Building a better financial life doesn’t require radical change. If you start out with small, achievable steps and then take those steps more frequently, you’ll feel the impact and the reward over time.”

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Understanding that the opportunity to set goals and strive for more is not confined to the New Year, Capital One is celebrating your Tiny Triumphs by sharing new tips on Twitter @CapitalOneCafe and Capital One Café Facebook page to encourage people to stay motivated and focused on their goals, one tiny step at a time. Capital One will also host a live event in Boston with James Clear at Capital One Café to discuss how anyone can achieve their big financial goals by shifting their mindset and approaching them one small step at a time.

The event will be live streamed via FORA.tv. Q&A will be hosted via the chat functionality on FORA.tv beginning at 6 p.m. EST/3 p.m. PST. Participants are encouraged to submit their inquiries. Registration to FORA.tv will be required to submit a question. 

  • When: Tuesday, March 20 | 6-7 p.m. EST/3-4 p.m. PST
  • Where: Capital One Café, 799 Boylston St, Boston, MA 02116
  • How to stream live: http://capxtalk.fora.tv/
  • Join the conversation: #CapXTalk #TinyTriumphs

For more details on how to achieve your #TinyTriumphs this year, stop by your local Capital One Café to speak with an Ambassador or Capital One Money Coach about how to get involved, identify your goals, and join the social community. For more information, follow @CaptialOneCafe on Twitter or Capital One Café on Facebook.

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[1] Statistic Brain, January 1, 2017; Twitter Study, January 3, 2017; NBC News, January 1, 2017
[2] Statistic Brain, January 1, 2017; Twitter Study, January 3, 2017; NBC News, January 1, 2017
[3] Statistic Brain, January 1, 2017; Twitter Study, January 3, 2017; NBC News, January 1, 2017
[4] The Stress in America: The State of Our Nation; American Psychological Association, November 1, 2017

This content was written by the advertiser and edited by BG BrandLab to uphold The Boston Globe's content standards. The news and editorial departments of The Boston Globe had no role in its writing, production, or display.